My name is Saad and i'm 20 years old. I am born and raised in Australia but I value my Pakistani ethnicity, culture and traditions, and I value my Islamic beliefs and Allah (God) the most.

~ The Australian Pakistani Muslim ~

☪ ٱلۡحَمۡدُ لِلَّهِ رَبِّ ٱلۡعَـٰلَمِينَ ☪

A key concept taught in Islam is that your love for your religion should be because you love your God, rather than you loving God because you love your religion. Reasons for this is that, by loving your religion too much, you can fall victim to narrow-mindedness and blind faith. You may defend your religion till your last breath but you might not know a word your holy scripture is saying, or even care. This leaves your religion vulnerable to manipulation, alteration and/or self interpretation. When your source of love comes from your love for your God, then you begin to look at everything critically and with reason, including your own religion. This is what is encouraged in Islam as when you develop a love for your God, you ensure to find something that compliments Him and does not insult Him. Due to this, you analyse and reason all given knowledge on God more critically. Does not everyone want to associate the best image to the ones they love? You then want to learn more about the one you love so you judge your religion according to whether it describes God in the best possible way, and when someone critics it, or you are given information on say, another religion’s version of God, you will open mindedly analyse the information rather than flat out denying. Through this you discover God in the best possible light, which allows you to whole-heartedly follow that which you came to a conclusion through your own reason and justifications. For Muslims, your prayer and other acts of worship become more sincere and that Arabic you recite 5 times a day or more gains meaning.

It is repeatedly noted that God never asks one to do something in the name of Islam. God says to do it in the way of Him; for your love for Him, not your religion. The Holy Scripture is filled with 114 chapters and each chapter gives you numerous justifications on why you should love Him. When God reasons with people of other religions, it’s stated how no matter which religion a person is from, the best of them are those who follow it for the truth, for their love for God. In Islam, instead of God telling the Prophets to tell the people of other faiths that they are totally wrong for what they believe, He tells the Prophets that those people have the right idea, but are going about it the wrong way. It is made understood to the Prophets that those who follow a religion out of love for God will be the ones who will be more open minded to the message conveyed. God very much prefers those who critically read the scripture and develop an understanding than those who follow it blindly. So if one critically analyses your religion, instead of being offended, one should welcome it. Hand out a copy of your scripture to help them reach that understanding. God in the Qur’an has mentioned that Islam triumphs when one does exactly that. So a Muslim should also read and understand why God says that in the Qur’an, so they can also understand and convey the message better, beating this negative image forced upon everyone today. If we can all follow the religion by the way the source of our religion has instructed us, then we can fix much problems in the world, especially the bad name of religion and its believers, as well as the extremism that manipulate religion to commit terror and bloodshed. No, religion is not subject to individuals self interpretation of the text. If that were the case, there would be no use for Prophets or holy scriptures. Literal instructions have been sent to follow the religion as instructed to you by God, so it’s best to understand what they are and follow accordingly. May Allah guide us to the truth and help improve our understanding, to make us better people and more successful in this life and the hereafter.

Check it out » Click here to support Bosnia flooding fund 2014 by Amina Nuhanović

(Source: saputnik, via iuvencula)

One of the key mechanisms of control by Israeli authorities is the issuing of ID status. Throughout the territory, an individual’s rights and freedoms are dictated by where they were born. Palestinians with Israeli citizenship — often referred to as “Arab Israelis” and who make up 20% of the Israeli population — face institutional discrimination. Though, they do have a better deal than Palestinians in the West Bank or Gaza, who are often confined to these occupied territories. Those from East Jerusalem can travel more freely, but if they move out of the city their status can be easily revoked.

That means that for Palestinians — even those that live in the areas that some might see as Palestinian territory — Israel controls some of the most basic aspects of life. In the West Bank, Israeli authorities have total or partial control over 82% of the territory, giving the Palestinian Authority jurisdiction only over the 18% called Area A. But even in this space, Israel takes the reins. It controls most of the West Bank’s water, for example, and even collects taxes on behalf of the Palestinian Authority. And crucially, Israel has the sole power to grant citizenship and residency status across the whole territory.

"When I go abroad, people I meet think Israel and Palestine are two separate lands," Ramzi Jaber, co-founder of Visualizing Palestine, told PolicyMic. "But that’s not the case. It’s one single border that’s controlled by a single authority. It’s one single currency, Israeli Shekels. It’s practically one economy, a captive economy with 70% of Palestinian imports coming from, and 86% of exports going to, Israel. Most importantly of all, there’s one single population registry controlled by Israel’s Ministry of Interior.”

The contiguity between what the world sees as Israel and Palestine being is blurred further all the time. In 2012, the UN estimated more than 500,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank and East Jerusalem — areas that are supposedly under negotiation as territory for the future Palestinian state. And that number only continues to grow. In 2013, the rate of Israeli settlement construction increased by 123%. Like everyone else in the territory, both settlers and Palestinians in those areas live under the same Israeli population registry, but with very different rights.

Read full article - PolicyMic / Image: Visualizing Palestine

(Source: thebowspring, via pippipcheeriopeasants)

If Allah has loved a servant [of His], He calls Gabriel (on whom be peace) and says: ‘I love So-and-so, therefore love him.’ He (the Prophet pbuh) said: “So Gabriel loves him. Then he (Gabriel) calls out in heaven, saying: ‘Allah loves So-and-so, therefore love him.’ And the inhabitants of heaven love him.” He (the Prophet pbuh) said: “Then acceptance is established for him on earth.” -

Hadith Qudsi (Muslim Bukhari, Malik, & Tirmidhi)

We all want love. From God, and from the creation. We are all running towards something. Ironically, the more we run after the creation, the more the creation runs away from us! As soon as we stop running after the creation, and reorient, as soon as we start running towards God, the creation runs after us. It’s a simple, simple formula:

Run towards the creation, you lose God and the creation. Run towards God, you gain God *and* the creation.

-Yasmin Mogahed

(via heartheraindrops-fall)

My Blog isnt a religious or political only blog! It is my personal blog in which i blog anything i really like and get the urge to hit that reblog button. It just so happens that no other posts tempt me to hit the reblog button as much as the Islamic posts do ^.^ Alhumdullilah for our such beautiful religion.

On a side note, NO MORE EXAMS FOR MEEEE! Holidays here i come =)

islamisinmyveins:

When you are in sujood, your eyes see nothing. Your eyes face the ground to disconnect yourself from your worldly matters. You’re in sujood to detach yourself from material possessions. When you’re in sujood, you are reminded you are being connected to God and God only.

(Source: asfa-riyaz, via aashiqal-islam)

  • Atheist: Can your Lord fit the entire universe into an egg without making the egg any bigger and the universe any smaller?
  • Jafar as Sadiq: I would like you to look at the sky, and at that bird in the sky, and at that tree, and at all those people who have gathered around us and now look at me.
  • Atheist: I see them all.
  • Jafar as Sadiq: If Allah can fit all of those things inside the tiny pupil of your eye, do you think that he cannot fit the universe into an egg?
2,524 notes

Check it out » When Memorization Gets in the Way of Learning | The Atlantic

cranquis:

mediiolab:

Ben Orlin:

Memorization is a frontage road: It runs parallel to the best parts of learning, never intersecting. It’s a detour around all the action, a way of knowing without learning, of answering without understanding.

Far too much of medical education relies on memorization (the bulk of the first two years are memorization) [1]. Lack of understanding in medicine is high stakes. Understanding is requisite to account for the variability inherent in practicing human medicine; it is impossible to teach or experience all permutations of disease presentations and management. Without understanding, doctors might miss a unique presentation, new disease, or a novel treatment.

One solution–open-book tests. When practicing medicine in the ‘real-world’ physicians now have the world’s medical knowledge at their fingertips. Why handicap students and not allow them to practice the vital skills of finding, assessing, and applying knowledge [2]? Additionally, this would force professors to write higher-level questions that must pass the Google Test [3]. Students would learn how to focus on important concepts instead of furiously trying to memorize every word [4].

Not mentioned by Mr Orlin, memorization has the further consequence of squashing creativity. If you only know the pieces but don’t understand how they work together, how can you think of new ways for them to work together? Now more than ever, we need creativity in medicine to solve the most vexing medical problems and ways to efficiently deliver those solutions. Memorization won’t get us there.

[via Ryan Madanick MD]


  1. The Krebs Cycle is the classic example. How many medical students are required to memorize the Krebs Cycle? How many practicing physicians can recite the Krebs Cycle from memory? How many use it in their daily practice? Need more evidence? Just look at the proliferation of flashcards and mnemonics in medical education.  ↩

  2. Javier Benitez MD argues in the this piece that we should be teaching ‘information management’ skills (like finding, assessing, and applying knowledge) in addition to evidence-based medicine.  ↩

  3. Essentially, if a simple Google search can provide an answer within seconds, then it is not a very high level question.  ↩

  4. Some students in my class would simply copy the text from a professor’s PowerPoint slide and paste it into an electronic flashcard, with the prompt for the flascard being the title on that PowerPoint slide. Talk about simple memorization…  ↩

Another terrific examination of an aspect of medical training, by the mind formerly known as NumberNeededToTreat.

I remember >10 years ago, an attending blowing my mind by explaining the pointlessness of closed-book exams that test for regurgitative memorization skills, instead of open-book exams which test for actual integrative learning that carries over into real-world usefulness. “Someday,” she said, “all med school and board exams will be open book. The computerized test will have 100,000 questions, and you can use any resource to answer as many questions as possible within the time limit. But the questions will be TOUGH.”

(Oh… and ain’t NOBODY remember the Krebs Cycle after the test, man…)

stay-human:

moslempress:

The Post  Day of Rage - Protests against Prawer Plan : In Photos

Pictures from the “day of rage” to protest the Prawer Plan, an Israeli government plan to destroy 35 Arab villages in the Negev desert that will lead to the forced displacement of up to 70,000 Bedouin citizens of the state of Israel in order to clear the land for Israeli Jews.